Understanding The Process of Anodising Aluminium

rust prevention

The primary purpose of anodising aluminium is for rust prevention, improve lubrication, and allow for colour dyeing that makes aluminium electrochemically. Anodising doesn’t apply aluminium oxide like plating or paint but is fully integrated with aluminium substrate to prevent peeling and chipping. There are four steps of anodising aluminium.

Pre-treatment. This is the first step that involves aluminium pre-treating by pickling, degreasing and creating a visible result. Satin or bright finishes are applied to produce the desired finish. Bright finishing is a way to clean any heavy metal residue from an aluminium that was not removed during the pre-treatment process, while the satin finishing involves light etching to create an even matte surface on the aluminium. Both finishing processes provide a clean and smooth surface for anodising.

Anodic oxide. The second step of the anodising process is to submerge the aluminium part into an acid electrolyte bath while electric current passes through. The aluminium serves as an anode that releases the oxygen ions and combines with aluminium atoms. This process is a type of controlled oxidisation that makes the metal chemically altered to reach the desired results. After anodising the aluminium, different methods are applied to colour it.

Colour anodising. There are various methods for colour anodising an aluminium. The most common technique is the electrolytic colouring that immerses the anodises aluminium into an organic metal salt bath. As the metal salts oxidise in the aluminium’s pores, an electric current is applied into the salt bath. The aluminium colour will depend on the length of time immersed and chemical conditions of the bath. The most common colour finishes include black, gold, brown, bronze, nickel, and clear.

Sealing. This is the final step of the anodising process. Sealing can be done in three effective ways, the hot method, the cold method, and the combination of the two. The hot method or boiling method involves a long immersion of the anodised aluminium in boiling hot water. This goes the same for the cold method. Sealing the aluminium is required and essential in rust prevention, corrosion and water leakage. It also prevents any stains and scratches.

Following this anodising aluminium process provides many benefits. These include durability as the result creates a reacted finish that is attached in the metal. Also, having an anodised aluminium saves you from repairing costs as it provides lower maintenance that makes it a long lasting product.

The primary purpose of anodising aluminium is for rust prevention, improve lubrication, and allow for colour dyeing that makes aluminium electrochemically. Anodising doesn’t apply aluminium oxide like plating or paint but is fully integrated with aluminium substrate to prevent peeling and chipping. There are four steps of anodising aluminium.

Pre-treatment. This is the first step that involves aluminium pre-treating by pickling, degreasing and creating a visible result. Satin or bright finishes are applied to produce the desired finish. Bright finishing is a way to clean any heavy metal residue from an aluminium that was not removed during the pre-treatment process, while the satin finishing involves light etching to create an even matte surface on the aluminium. Both finishing processes provide a clean and smooth surface for anodising.

Anodic oxide. The second step of the anodising process is to submerge the aluminium part into an acid electrolyte bath while electric current passes through. The aluminium serves as an anode that releases the oxygen ions and combines with aluminium atoms. This process is a type of controlled oxidisation that makes the metal chemically altered to reach the desired results. After anodising the aluminium, different methods are applied to colour it.

Colour anodising. There are various methods for colour anodising an aluminium. The most common technique is the electrolytic colouring that immerses the anodises aluminium into an organic metal salt bath. As the metal salts oxidise in the aluminium’s pores, an electric current is applied into the salt bath. The aluminium colour will depend on the length of time immersed and chemical conditions of the bath. The most common colour finishes include black, gold, brown, bronze, nickel, and clear.

Sealing. This is the final step of the anodising process. Sealing can be done in three effective ways, the hot method, the cold method, and the combination of the two. The hot method or boiling method involves a long immersion of the anodised aluminium in boiling hot water. This goes the same for the cold method. Sealing the aluminium is required and essential in rust prevention, corrosion and water leakage. It also prevents any stains and scratches.

Following this anodising aluminium process provides many benefits. These include durability as the result creates a reacted finish that is attached in the metal. Also, having an anodised aluminium saves you from repairing costs as it provides lower maintenance that makes it a long lasting product.